(WHNT) – If you didn’t file a tax return in 2017, you still might be able to file and get a refund if you act before the deadline.

The IRS said Monday that the agency is sitting on $1.3 billion in refunds due to roughly 1.3 million taxpayers who haven’t filed yet.

The law allows taxpayers a three-year window to file a return for previous years.

“The IRS wants to help taxpayers who are due refunds but haven’t filed their 2017 tax returns yet,” said IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig. “Time is quickly running out for these taxpayers. There’s only a three-year window to claim these refunds, and the window closes on May 17. We want to help people get these refunds, but they will need to quickly file a 2017 tax return.”

IRS officials estimate the midpoint of the returns to be $865 – meaning half the unsent refunds are more than $865 and half are under $865.

For taxpayers mailing their return, it must be postmarked by May 17.

Checks may be withheld if filers didn’t file in 2018 or 2019, and will be applied to any debts owed to the IRS or state tax agency, as well as unpaid child support or federal debt, such as student loans.

Eligible taxpayers may also be able to receive the Earned Income Tax Credit, worth up to $6,318.

Those with income under the following amounts are eligible for the credit:

  • $48,340 ($53,930 if married filing jointly) for those with three or more qualifying children;
  • $45,007 ($50,597 if married filing jointly) for people with two qualifying children;
  • $39,617 ($45,207 if married filing jointly) for those with one qualifying child, and;
  • $15,010 ($20,600 if married filing jointly) for people without qualifying children.

Forms for current and previous tax years can be found on the IRS website or by calling (800) TAX-FORM.

Filers missing a W-2, 1098, 1099 or 5498 should request them from the proper organization (such as their employer, bank, or other payer). If unable to get the copies directly from the organization, they can be requested through the IRS, either online or by filing Form 4506-T.

State-by-state estimates of individuals who may be due 2017 income tax refunds (per IRS)

State or Estimated Median Total
District Number of Potential Potential
Individuals Refund Refunds*
Alabama 21,700 $848 $21,542,300
Alaska 5,000 $960 $5,527,400
Arizona 32,900 $766 $30,655,500
Arkansas 12,600 $811 $12,150,900
California 132,800 $833 $129,793,500
Colorado 27,000 $813 $26,020,400
Connecticut 13,200 $928 $13,945,100
Delaware 5,200 $853 $5,254,600
District of Columbia 3,600 $878 $3,765,500
Florida 89,600 $870 $89,767,400
Georgia 46,300 $791 $44,234,300
Hawaii 7,600 $913 $7,827,400
Idaho 6,200 $727 $5,572,300
Illinois 49,000 $901 $50,355,300
Indiana 30,800 $894 $31,291,100
Iowa 13,500 $922 $13,851,800
Kansas 13,400 $865 $13,313,500
Kentucky 17,700 $875 $17,612,600
Louisiana 21,700 $837 $21,659,900
Maine 5,300 $853 $5,158,000
Maryland 26,700 $872 $27,241,700
Massachusetts 28,000 $978 $30,469,100
Michigan 43,100 $863 $43,189,300
Minnesota 20,400 $808 $19,400,200
Mississippi 11,800 $776 $11,087,800
Missouri 30,500 $831 $29,778,200
Montana 4,400 $808 $4,255,500
Nebraska 7,200 $853 $6,982,000
Nevada 15,500 $845 $15,310,600
New Hampshire 5,900 $968 $6,391,000
New Jersey 34,200 $924 $35,778,700
New Mexico 9,000 $837 $8,913,100
New York 66,700 $956 $71,361,600
North Carolina 43,500 $837 $42,307,200
North Dakota 3,600 $958 $3,779,100
Ohio 48,700 $852 $47,892,500
Oklahoma 19,800 $869 $19,890,300
Oregon 21,200 $765 $19,733,900
Pennsylvania 50,900 $931 $52,861,200
Rhode Island 3,600 $921 $3,792,500
South Carolina 16,800 $768 $15,740,900
South Dakota 3,600 $912 $3,665,500
Tennessee 27,100 $851 $26,534,100
Texas 133,000 $904 $138,355,200
Utah 11,100 $771 $10,251,900
Vermont 2,600 $852 $2,505,200
Virginia 36,600 $827 $36,159,900
Washington 36,900 $928 $38,924,900
West Virginia 6,400 $946 $6,769,600
Wisconsin 18,900 $798 $17,759,900
Wyoming 3,100 $944 $3,273,400
Totals 1,345,900 $865 $1,349,654,800

Read More

Leave a Reply